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Politics Technology

IET Communications Policy Panel at the House of Lords

I was fortunate to be invited as an Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Diamond Jubilee scholar to the 10th Communications Policy Panel luncheon, hosted by Lord Broers (an electrical engineer, and Vice Chancellor at Cambridge) this Tuesday, 27th November. The topics of discussion focused on the key issues around 5G for policymakers — having worked with the mobile team at BT Labs over summer, 5G is a particular area of interest for me.

Milo Noblet (IET Diamond Jubilee scholar), Martina Cheadle (IET Diamond Jubilee alumna) and Sir Edmund Burton kbe
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Politics Technology

Enforcing the new TV Licensing rules

Further to ‘Thoughts on the “iPlayer Loophole”‘, The Telegraph this morning revealed that the BBC will be deploying a new breed of ‘detector van’ to catch those who don’t cough up.

The article says “the BBC vans will fan out … capturing information from private WiFi networks to “sniff out” those who have not paid”. It’s clear that the proposal is to capture information from home wireless networks – we are told the BBC has been given “legal dispensation” to use WiFi-sniffing technology “which is typically only available to crime-fighting agencies.”

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Politics Technology

Thoughts on “The iPlayer Loophole”

In the UK, one requires a licence to watch television as it is broadcast live, which costs around £145/year. However, no such licence is required to watch television programmes on catch-up services such as the BBC’s iPlayer. Of course, in the eyes of the BBC, this is a Bad Thing, as sales of DVD box sets of series will fall.

So the BBC have announced that from 1 September 2016 the “iPlayer loophole” will be removed.

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Politics

@MomentumWirral seem to be confused by percentages

Hmm, I don’t think that’s a good sign for a “party of the people”. As below:

Or maybe, we should stop making statements based on Twitter polls and carry out proper, representative surveys.